Grains Research and Development

GRDC Update Papers

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This page contains papers from the GRDC Update series for both growers and advisers.

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  • Farming systems strategies to manage fleabane and feathertop Rhodes grass

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    31.07.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    NGA00003, DA00137, UQ00055, UQ00062
    Presented At
    Presented at the Roma GRDC Grains Research Update August 2015 by Richard Daniel.
    Region
    North

    1. Glyphosate resistant and tolerant weeds are a major threat to our reduced tillage cropping systems
    2. Although residual herbicides will limit re-cropping options and will not provide complete control, they are a key part of successful management
    3. Double-knock herbicide strategies (sequential application of two different weed control tactics) are useful tools but the herbicide choices and optimal timings will vary by weed species
    4. Incorporate other weed management tactics e.g. crop competition to assist herbicide control
    5. Cultivation may need to be considered as a salvage option to avoid seed bank replenishment

  • Crown rot an update on latest research

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    24.07.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    DAN00175
    Presented At
    Presented at the Moree GRDC Grains Research Update July 2015 by Steve Simpfendorfer
    Region
    North

    Take home messages
    • Impact of crown rot on yield and quality is a balance between inoculum levels and soil water
    • The balance is heavily tipped towards soil water yet most management strategies tend to focus solely on combating inoculum, sometimes to the detriment of soil water
    • Cultivation (even shallow) distributes infected residue more evenly across paddocks and into the infection zones below ground for crown rot. This IS NOT good!
    • Some of the newer wheat varieties appear promising in that they provide improved tolerance to crown rot
    • PreDicta B is a good technique for identifying the level of risk for crown rot (and other soil-borne pathogens) prior to sowing within paddocks. However, this requires a dedicated sampling strategy and IS NOT a simple add on to a soil nutrition test

  • The what where and why of soil testing in the northern region

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    24.07.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    UQ00063, UQ00066
    Presented At
    Presented at the Moree, Coonamble and Nindigully GRDC Grains Research Update July and August 2015 by Mike Bell.
    Region
    North

    Soil testing is a key component of ensuring both sustainable land management in the longer term and maximising the chance of reaching the water-limited yield potential in the coming season. The sampling strategy adopted will be determined by the reason for sampling (fertility monitoring or fertilizer diagnosis), the size and availability of the different pools nutrient in the soil (determining the appropriate laboratory test method), the mobility of the nutrients of concern in the soil profile (determining soil layers of interest) and the root activity of different rotation species in that soil type-seasonal rainfall combination.
    The correct soil sampling strategy and diagnosis of potential nutrient limitations will not guarantee an economic response to applied fertilizer, as seasonal conditions and inappropriate application strategy (timing or placement) can reduce the crop nutrient requirement or limit crop recovery of the applied nutrient. However, it will ensure the best possible chance of delivering on water-limited yield potential in the coming season and represents value for money in a farm management plan.
    This paper discusses current thinking on soil sampling methodology (frequency, depth intervals), analytical methods and interpretation relative to fertilizer N responsiveness for the northern grains region.

  • Grain sorghum varietal reactions to heat stress and environment

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    24.07.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    UQ00065
    Presented At
    Presented at the July Moree GRDC Grains Research Updates 2015 by Scott Chapman
    Region
    North

    1. Sorghum seed set is reduced by high temperature effects (>36-38oC) on pollen around flowering
    2. Sorghum genotypes differ in their tolerance to high temperature stress
    3. Risk of high temperature damage depends on sowing date and variety
    4. Climate change will exacerbate high temperature effects but avoidance by crop management and genetic tolerance seems possible
    5. While late plantings (mid Jan) in NNSW avoid heat, late cultivars sown at this time have increased risk of cold conditions that reduce grain yield, and exposure to weather that may favour ergot.

  • Improving northern farming systems performance

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    24.07.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    CSA00050, DAQ00192
    Presented At
    Presented at the July/August 2015 Moree, Coonamble, Roma and Jondaryan GRDC Grains Research Updates by Lindsay Bell and at the Nindigully Update by Bec Raymond
    Region
    North

    Take home message
    GRDC is investing in research aimed at understanding how the performance of current farming systems can be improved.
    Systems with different crop intensity (or frequency), crop sequences, system inputs and practices aimed at maintaining long-term soil resources are being compared experimentally.
    System modifications and their interactions of these various modifications are being examined at a core experiment site on the Eastern Darling downs, and 6 regional sites across the northern region are examining locally relevant system modifications.
    Experimental data and modelling are being used to assess changes and effects of the different farming systems on several attributes (e.g. water use efficiency, nutrient use efficiency, soil resource, pathogen and weed populations).

  • Chickpea Ascochyta update what is happening in the paddock

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    24.07.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    DAN00143, DAN00176, UM00052
    Presented At
    Presented at the Moree GRDC Grains Research Update July 2015 by Kevin Moore
    Region
    North

    • Localities where Ascochyta was found in 2014 are considered high risk for 2015 crops and growers are advised to apply a preventative fungicide before the first post-emergent rain event to all varieties including PBA HatTrick and PBA Boundary .
    • From 27-30 June 2015, 49 chickpea crops in the Moree region were inspected for Ascochyta – the disease was NOT found in any crop nor in a paddock of volunteer chickpeas that were starting to pod.
    • We believe the absence of detectable Ascochyta reflects judicious prophylactic management in high risk areas and lack of inoculum in low risk areas.

  • Quality defects in chickpeas

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    24.07.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    DAN00196
    Presented At
    Presented at the July 2015 GRDC Grains Research Update at Moree by Dr Jenny Wood
    Region
    North

    Seed quality defects are a risk to the good quality reputation of Australian chickpeas. We need grower and adviser help to minimise the incidence of seed markings into the future.

  • Report on the 2013 GOA Herbicide Resistance Survey

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    24.07.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    GOA00001
    Presented At
    Presented at the Coonamble GRDC Grains Research Update July 2015 by Maurie Street.
    Region
    North

    The aims of this survey were to establish what the current level and types of herbicide resistance are in the Central West of NSW. In doing so, this would raise awareness of the issue to foster a change in attitude and following on from this, a greater willingness to address the issue. The information provided from this survey would aid growers and agronomists to make more informed decisions around herbicide choices or in fact even management strategies beyond simple herbicide rotations

  • Pre-emergent herbicides part of the solution but much still to learn

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    24.07.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    NGA00003
    Presented At
    Presented at the Coonamble GRDC Grains Research Update July 2015 by Richard Daniel.
    Region
    North

    1. The use of a disc planter for incorporation by sowing (IBS) of residual herbicides resulted in significantly reduced wheat emergence for all four herbicides evaluated
    2. The disc planter ‘set-up’ actually increased the risk of crop damage
    3. These results reinforce the need to only use narrow point tynes when using residual herbicides with IBS recommendations
    4. Residual herbicides are important tools for the effective and economic management of key summer fallow weeds
    5. Use of residual herbicides in fallow may suit operations with access to optical sprayers
    6. Individual paddock rotations may need to change to enable use of residual chemistry in preceding fallows or in-crop

  • Practical management of high level phosphine resistance in Rusty grain beetle

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    24.07.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    PAD00001
    Presented At
    Presented at the Coonamble and Roma GRDC Grains Research Updates July/August 2015 by Philip Burrill.
    Region
    North

    Rusty grain beetle (RGB) is one of three Flat grain beetle species seen in Australian stored grain. If flat grain beetles survive a fumigation using phosphine, it is important to send the live insects to a laboratory for resistance testing. ProFume® may be recommended if it is the strong resistant strain of RGB.
    Consider using this simple “farm storage checklist” that works towards establishing best practice and building a professional, mutually beneficial relationship with your key grain buyers
    To achieve reliable grain quality and pest control results, use an integrated strategy of good storage hygiene, monthly monitoring / recording, aeration cooling and appropriate use of protectants and fumigation when required.