Grains Research and Development

GRDC Update Papers

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This page contains papers from the GRDC Update series for both growers and advisers.

To download the proceedings booklets from the 2014 Updates, visit the 2014 Update Proceedings Booklets page.

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  • Seeding systems and pre emergence herbicides

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    27.02.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    UA00113; UA00134
    Presented At
    Warren GRDC Grains Research Update 2015
    Region
    North

    Keeping the weed seeds on the soil surface will improve control by pre-emergence herbicides, so minimise soil disturbance.
    Pre-emergent herbicides can cause crop damage. Separation of the product from crop seed is essential, this is more easily achieved in knife-point & press wheel seeding systems but considerably more difficult with low soil disturbance discs.
    Choose the right herbicide for the job – not all pre-emergent herbicides behave the same so follow label recommendations closely. Be mindful that volatile herbicides like trifluralin and triallate (Avadex® Xtra) require some incorporation to limit herbicide losses from volatilisation and sunlight degradation.

  • Making good decisions great (Northern Update paper)

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    25.02.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    SFS023
    Presented At
    Coonabarabran and Goondiwindi GRDC Grains Research Updates 2015
    Region
    North

    Don’t assume people know how to make a good decision.
    A ‘good’ decision is an informed decision where you need to appreciate the consequences of the various actions, especially the potential losses.
    Seek to understand what may be subconscious influences on a decision, be it the type of decision required, the ‘rules’ being applied, stress, emotion, the growers values and personality.
    Advisors can develop the capacity to apply the right process to enhance decision making but also to better ‘read’ and help the clients they are working with.

  • Finding more yield and profit from your farming system

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    25.02.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    APT00001
    Presented At
    Coonabarabran GRDC Grains Research Update 2015
    Region
    North

    There is enormous potential to improve farm profits if the gap between average farm yields and attainable grain crop yield, which is between 50 and 100%, can be reduced. This requires finely tuned farming systems and agronomy, but in conjunction with good management of machinery, labour, finance and the timeliness of operations.

    The main difference between average and top farmers is the occurrence of problems which affect yield. In practice many crops are affected by several ‘profit draggers’, like disease, nematodes, weeds, low nitrogen, timeliness or harvest losses, which in combination affect yield by 20-30 % and drag down profit by 50-60%.

    To manage well requires attention to all the profit draggers, but good results also requires time and effort to be put into crop selection, rotations, crop frequency, risk management and farm cost choices. Teamwork, labour, safety and machinery decisions are also important.

  • Insect management in fababeans and canola recent research

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    25.02.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    DAQ00153
    Presented At
    Coonabarabran and Goondiwindi GRDC Grains Research Updates 2015
    Region
    North

    Compensatory capacity of canola supports the use of less conservative aphid thresholds, and increased consideration of natural enemies in controlling outbreaks.
    Beatsheet and sweep net sampling of faba beans both severely underestimate the density of larvae, and particularly the smaller larvae. A visual inspection of faba bean terminals, flowers and buds is critical to improved estimates of smaller larvae.
    Whilst important, insect damage does not constitute the majority of defective grain.

  • Wheat variety response to sowing time

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    25.02.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    DAN00167
    Presented At
    Coonabarabran and Goondiwindi GRDC Updates 2015
    Region
    North

    Variety response to sowing time data can be used to better match variety to sowing date.
    Variety selection and response to sowing time needs to be considered in the context of a risk management strategy.
    Trial result case study scenarios highlight the potential yield and economic outcomes, of targeting sowing window opportunities with differing genotypes.
    Growers are encouraged to retain a number of varieties with a range of maturities (yield response curves), to ensure that yield potential is maximised and risk is minimised.

  • Chickpea and mungbean research to maximise yield in northern NSW

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    25.02.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    DAN00171
    Presented At
    Coonabarabran and Warren GRDC Grains Research Updates 2015
    Region
    North

    When sowing chickpea within the optimum sowing window (mid May – early June):
    for yield potential ≥ 1.5 t/ha - sow at ≥ 30 plants/m2,
    for yield potential ≤ 1.5 t/ha - sow at ≥ 20 plants/m2.
    When sowing chickpea very late (not recommended) consider sowing at the higher target plant density, to compensate for potentially poorer establishment.
    Mid-late May should be considered the optimum sowing window for chickpeas. A substantial yield penalty is likely to be incurred when sowing is delayed until mid-late June.
    Kabuli chickpea types can have equal yield potential to desi types if sown early, but greatly reduced yields if sowing is delayed.
    An optimum plant density of at least 30 plants/m2 for mungbeans is recommended under irrigated conditions, with further research required to justify an increase to 35 or 40 plants/m2.

  • Phytophthora in chickpea varieties - resistance rankings and yield loss

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    25.02.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    DAN00176, DAQ00186
    Presented At
    Coonabarabran, Warren and Goondiwindi Updates 2015
    Region
    North

    Even in a dry season, substantial yield losses from PRR can occur in susceptible varieties such as PBA Boundary
    Do not grow PBA Boundary if you suspect a PRR risk
    Avoid paddocks with a history of lucerne, medics or chickpea PRR
    There is no yield penalty in the absence of PRR associated with varieties with improved resistance to PRR

  • Social media for ageing agronomists - social media to speed access to and share new stuff

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    25.02.2015
    Presented At
    Goondiwindi and Coonabarabran GRDC Grains Research Updates 2015
    Region
    North

    Social media (Twitter in particular) is here to stay and has real benefits for those in the grains industry by allowing real-time information sharing. Outlining what you want to achieve from a social media presence and developing a strategy will help you derive the most value.

  • Chickpea ascochyta - evidence that varieties do differ in susceptibility of pods

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    25.02.2015
    GRDC Project Code
    DAN00176, DAN00151
    Presented At
    Coonabarabran, Warren and Goondiwindi GRDC Grains Research Updates
    Region
    North

    The susceptibility of pods to Ascochyta Blight is important as infection can cause pod abortion, blemish or kill seed, infected seed is also an inoculum source.

    Field trial results indicate that the varietal resistance of chickpea pods are similar to that of vegetative tissue.

  • Soil Sodicity chemistry physics and amelioration

    Research Updates

    Grains

    Article Date
    25.02.2015
    Presented At
    Goondiwindi and Coonabarabran GRDC Grains Research Updates 2015
    Region
    North

    At a mechanistic level, the adverse effects of sodicity on plant growth are reasonably well understood. Unfortunately, differences in soil and plant characteristics, climate and agronomy mean that this understanding cannot be directly converted to a simple set of fool-proof rules.
    Like most cropping problems, growers and agronomists need to complement their knowledge of the underlying bio-physical system with careful observation to craft a solution appropriate for their situation.