Grains Research and Development

 

Pest suppressive landscapes: linking IPM and natural resource management

Researcher's Name:
NancySchellhorn
Organisation:
CSIRO
Email:
Phone:
07 3214 2721
Fax:
07 3214 2881
Project Code:
CSE00051
Contract Start:
29/6/2009
Contract End:
31/3/2013

Summary

This project focuses on identifying the characteristics of pest suppressive landscapes and adopts a national approach. To understand how the population dynamics of grain pests are affected by landscape composition we will (i) identify source habitats of pests and natural enemies, (ii) assess their movement between habitats and (iii) determine time of crop colonization. The habitats studied will include crop and non-crop such as native remnant vegetation. This work will be conducted in agricultural landscapes in north, south and west Australia. Spatially explicit models will be developed that integrate field data collected in each landscape. These models will be used to explore the links between crop and non-crop habitats and which landscape configurations are less prone to pest attack. This approach allows us to develop guiding principles of IPM at the field, farm and landscape scale which work towards achieving reduced reliance on broad-spectrum insecticides and sustainable management of natural resources.

Background

This project focuses on identifying the characteristics of pest suppressive landscapes and adopts a national approach. To understand how the population dynamics of grain pests are affected by landscape composition we will (i) identify source habitats of pests and natural enemies, (ii) assess their movement between habitats and (iii) determine time of crop colonization. The habitats studied will include crop and non-crop such as native remnant vegetation. This work will be conducted in agricultural landscapes in north, south and west Australia. Spatially explicit models will be developed that integrate field data collected in each landscape. These models will be used to explore the links between crop and non-crop habitats and which landscape configurations are less prone to pest attack. This approach allows us to develop guiding principles of IPM at the field, farm and landscape scale which work towards achieving reduced reliance on broad-spectrum insecticides and sustainable management of natural resources.

Implications

to be assessed

Objectives

This project focuses on identifying the characteristics of pest suppressive landscapes and adopts a national approach. To understand how the population dynamics of grain pests are affected by landscape composition we will (i) identify source habitats of pests and natural enemies, (ii) assess their movement between habitats and (iii) determine time of crop colonization. The habitats studied will include crop and non-crop such as native remnant vegetation. This work will be conducted in agricultural landscapes in north, south and west Australia. Spatially explicit models will be developed that integrate field data collected in each landscape. These models will be used to explore the links between crop and non-crop habitats and which landscape configurations are less prone to pest attack. This approach allows us to develop guiding principles of IPM at the field, farm and landscape scale which work towards achieving reduced reliance on broad-spectrum insecticides and sustainable management of natural resources.

Outcomes

This combined empirical and modelling approach allows us to provide guidelines on IPM at the field, farm and landscape scale.

Research

To understand how the population dynamics of grain pests are affected by landscape composition we will (i) identify reproduction habitats of pests and natural enemies, (ii) assess their movement between habitats and (iii) time of crop colonization. This work will be conducted in agricultural landscapes in north, south and west Australia. Spatially explicit models will be developed that integrate the results of field measurements. These models will be used to explore which landscape configurations are less prone to pest attack and evaluate the effectiveness of IPM options in various landscapes.

Publications

No publications have come out yet

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